Plant-Based Meat: Just A Fad Or The Future Of Sustainability?
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Plant-Based Meat: Just A Fad Or The Future Of Sustainability?

Plant-Based Meat: Just A Fad Or The Future Of Sustainability?

A few years ago, if someone brought up plant-based meat, they would get a weird stare and a chuckle. What sounded good about meat made out of … plants? But a lot has changed since then. Now, the market for plant-based meat is only continuing to grow in popularity, with projections for the market to be worth $85 billion by 2030. With many major industries adopting plant-based options to their menus, it is showing the world’s gradual recognition of the dangers of climate change.

To get a better idea of where the plant-based meat industry is going, we chatted with Lone Thomsen, the Chief Marketing Officer at The Meatless Farm Company, a UK-based startup that looks to reduce meat consumption and offer customers a tasty, more environmentally-friendly alternative to their diets.

What’s Driving The Surge Of Plant-Based Meat?

A Deloitte study found that consumers’ rising desire for plant-based meat actually isn’t from vegetarians or vegans alone. Rather, it is “flexitarians” who are largely driving the market.

Flexitarians still eat meat but want to reduce their daily consumption for health or sustainability reasons. As reported by Barclay’s, roughly one-third of Americans, or 100 million people, follow a flexitarian diet. And that number is only continuing to rise.

Plant-based meat isn’t just a fad, Thomsen says. And the growing number of flexitarians proves this is true.

Lone Thomsen, CMO at The Meatless Farm Company, tells us she believes plant-based meat is here to stay.
Lone Thomsen, CMO at The Meatless Farm Company, tells us she believes plant-based meat is here to stay.

“Consumers have become more conscious about what they eat and how that impacts their bodies and health as well as the environmental footprint,” Thomsen said in an e-mail. “It’s [plant-based meat alternatives] good for you and it’s good for the planet.”

The key to success for the emerging plant-based meat market? Options. A huge influx of popular franchises, such as Burger King, Red Robin, and White Castle, have adopted meatless options to their menus.

Now, The Meatless Farm Company, Impossible Foods, Beyond Meat, and others are hoping to make this dietary switch even more convenient for consumers.

How Did The Meatless Farm Company Come To Be?

Founder Morten Toft Bech started the company in 2016 when his family struggled to prepare meals that were both nutritious and tasty but also didn’t hurt the planet.

Two years later, The Meatless Farm Company engineered a recipe for meatless burger patties, mince, and sausages. A mix of herbs and spices, rice, beetroot, carrots, and pea and soy protein sources make up their products. All ingredients are sustainably sourced.

“By offering a product that cooks, tastes, and looks like meat, we are offering consumers an easy solution to change their behavior and reduce their red meat consumption whilst still being able to enjoy their favourite recipes and getting the right nutritional levels,” Thomsen said.

The Meatless Farm Company launched exclusively with Whole Foods last summer and has plans for further expansion in 2020. The company has also just recently kicked off its partnership with the Italian restaurant Pomodoro Rosso in New York.

Through these collaborations, the company hopes to show consumers how versatile their products are and how they can be easily integrated into traditional cuisines.

What Is The Impact Of Going Meatless?

Recently, there has been a huge push for more people to adhere to “Meatless Mondays.” This flexitarian concept encourages people to go meatless for just one day of the week.

Reducing daily meat consumption has proven to an extremely healthy dietary switch. Just some of its positive implications include decreasing the risk of heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Not to mention, going meatless is also extremely beneficial to the environment.

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On the Meatless Mondays website, there are three main reasons to limit consumption for the environment. For one, it helps decrease water usage. In comparison to the 39 gallons of water it takes to produce a pound of vegetables, just one pound of meat requires 1,700 gallons of water.

Two, a reduction in daily meat intake also helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Three, it also helps lower fossil fuel dependency. If grain used to feed livestock was instead used to feed people, it’d be enough to feed 840 million people.

Earlier this year, The Meatless Farm Company debuted its “Meatless Consumption Target” campaign. Their goal was to encourage UK households to switch to one plant-based meal per week.

In a study performed alongside environmental scientist Dr. Joseph Poore, researchers found if every UK household were to swap out meat for one meal a week, greenhouse gas emissions in the UK would be cut by 8.4% (or 50 million tons). That’s the same as removing 16 million cars from the road.

Looking Ahead At The Future Of Plant-Based Meat

Anyone can go out to a fast-food restaurant and try a meatless burger out of curiosity. However, companies like The Meatless Farm Company want to make sure plant-based meat can be served at home too.

One of the biggest concerns with adopting a more flexitarian diet is that of convenience. Sure, it is easy to point fingers at those not following the perfectly sustainable diet. However, until recently, access to these options was fairly limited.

Typically, the typical consumer focuses on two things: accessibility and affordability. As companies continue to come up with more plant-based meat options, we should expect more consumers to change up their diet — even if it’s just for one day out of the week.

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